Why Resources Aren’t As Bad As You Think

Posted on Posted in Auto & Motor

Tips for Shopping for Your First Welder When buying your first welder, identify beforehand the types of welding materials and projects you will be working on mostly. Will you use it to sculpt metal? Perhaps you want to restore that old muscle car in your garage. Does your three-year-old motorcycle require a little fabrication? Or maybe you need to do some basic repairs on some of your farm equipment. When you know what projects will take up the biggest percentage of your welding activity, it will be easier to determine the metal thickness you will be welding most of the time, and eventually, the right welder model to buy. Take note that plenty of these materials are made from combinations of two or more metals, which is great for reinforcing the tool’s strength and functionality. As a first-timer, you have to consider many key factors before deciding which welder to buy, and a big part of this has something to do with your budget. The product you choose must be compatible with the specific functions you need, and the projects you plan to work on the most.
Finding Parallels Between Supplies and Life
Know your current goals for getting a welder and what probable uses it may have later on. In other words, do you think you will need more power and amperage sometime in the future? Aside from the cost of the welder itself, consider the costs of accessories and supplies that will be needed to operate the tool. These may include gas, protection items like gloves and a helmet, and so on.
Finding Similarities Between Supplies and Life
As you check out various products, take note of the different amperage requirements of each one, including power requirements and duty-cycle that is needed to get the most efficient results. What is duty cycle, exactly? A way to classify the size of a welder is by the amperage it can generate at a particular “duty cycle. Duty cycle is the number of minutes within a span of 10 minutes that a welder can work. A particular welder, for example, can do 300 amps of welding output with a duty cycle of 60%. What this means is that it can weld continuously at 300 amps for six minutes, but it has to cool down for the remaining four minutes to avoid overheating. To determine whether a machine will be able to meet your DIY needs, consider that light industrial products typically have duty cycle of 20% and a rate output of 230 amps or less. Typically, industrial products will have a 40 to 60 % duty cycle and a 300 amps or less rated output. Buying something without thinking it through is never smart. Give yourself time to define what you need. Again, since you’re a first-timer, you will likely have questions in your mind. Don’t hesitate to talk to an expert.